Claiming multiple priorities for your trademark application in India

Businesses which have (or are) trying to register their trademarks in several countries would be familiar with the concept of priority rights. If a person has applied for registration/registered a mark in his home IP office at Country A, then on the basis of the original application, he can apply for the registration of his mark in Country B, claiming a “priority date” (from the original application in Country A) whereby his mark will be considered to be registered as on the date of application…

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Legal Notices in Intellectual Property Right cases: A slippery slope?

More often than not, when a “bona fide” proprietor of the trademark (I use the term “bona fide” rather loosely here) finds unauthorized use of their mark by a third party, the first step taken (often) is to send the other party a legal notice. While some legal notices sent/received are convoluted and packed with legal jargon, some are brief and get the message across. A legal notice simply outlines the rights of the sender (“bona fide” proprietor) and cautions the infringing party to refrain…

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Morality & IP – How far is too far?

“Intellectual property rights” is a paradox, where it promotes innovation and creativity, on the one hand, it might stagnate and monopolize ideas and business, on the other. With the development of human intelligence, complications also arose such that it became necessary to balance man’s imagination and the output of such imagination.

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Understanding the trademark distinctiveness spectrum

The primary purpose of a trademark is that it serves to distinguish the goods or services of one person from those of another. If a mark is not distinctive, it could lead to confusion in the minds of consumers and deceive them as to the origin of the product or service it represents. To prevent such confusion and deception, Section 9(1)(a) of the Trade Marks Act prohibits the registration of any mark which lacks distinctiveness.

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Caught in the cross-hairs of the WIPO & Indian Trademark Office

The procedure and timeline to obtain registration for a trademark have evolved over time.  After the amendment of 2017, the entire timeline has become quite stricter and quicker. We have all seen a lot of positive changes happening in the IP regime, however, there are still areas where we lag and would do extremely well to have clearer rules and laws, especially with respect to trademark applications under the Madrid protocol.

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Amendments brought about to INDRP for .in domain disputes

The National Internet Exchange of India (NIXI) has notified certain changes to the INDRP Rules of Procedure. The new policy is aimed at streamlining the INDRP process, making it easier for rights holders to protect and enforce their rights against unauthorized registration of .in domains or .in domain squatting.

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What’s in a Surname – Trademarking Surnames

Businesses in India have often been started by using the surname or family name of the person starting such business. This practise has been followed in India for a very long time and such practice of adopting a surname for the name of the business is done purely so that customers can easily associate the surname so adopted with that particular business.

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Statutory License, Royalties, Radio broadcasters and a Public Notice

Section 31 D of the Copyright Act, 1957 has been the bone of contention on many occasions with regard to issuing statutory licenses and the scope of broadcasters. In simple words, Section 31D  of the Copyright Act 1957 states that any broadcasting organization that wishes to communicate sound recordings, literary or musical work to the public may be allowed to do so by obtaining a statutory license after giving prior notice and payment of royalties to the owner of the copyright at rates that…

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Public Performance of Music & Copyright Licenses. Time to Face the Music?

Most commercial establishments often play popular music as a form of entertainment for their patrons. Step into any mall, hotel, pub, restaurant, or gym, and there is a high chance that they will be playing a song that you know. Since music falls under the scope of copyright as intellectual property, any commercial establishment playing music must obtain a license from the appropriate rights holder in order to play such music.

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Designating India in your IR trademark application with the ® Registered symbol

One of our IR applications designating India was a mark filed with the ® symbol with the WIPO. To give you clarity, the basic registration (mark it, it is a registration and not an application), is from a country which allows marks with the ® symbol. So it was never a problem in the basic registration. Going even further to make the process smooth and avoid unnecessary hassle, the Applicant has also disclaimed the ® symbol in the IR application.

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